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Tower Hall at SJSU

Markup Languages Lab

We will be preparing to do the Dreamweaver Section of our class by talking about Markup Languages.

Introducing Markup Languages
According to Wikipedia, a markup language is a set of annotations to text that describe how it is to be structured, laid out, or formatted. Markup languages have been in use for centuries, and in recent years have also been used in computer typesetting and word-processing systems. Example: Editing and Proof Reading Marks (PDF).

A well-known example of a markup language in use today in computing is HyperText Markup Language (HTML), one of the protocols of the World Wide Web. HTML follows some of the markup conventions used in the publishing industry in the communication of printed work between authors, editors, and printers. You do not need to know HTML to be able to use tools like Adobe Dreamweaver CS3 to make Web pages. Just like you do not have to know how a car engine works.

To take the car metaphor further, you have to know basic principles of how cars operate. If you do not understand these principles your car will stop operating and you can break your car. For example, you have to know you need to put gasoline in your car for it to go. You also have keep your oil and water levels high enough or you will ruin the engine of your car. You also need to understand the basic principles of markup languages to have your Web pages work right and to keep from breaking your Web site. So, for this lab, we are going to hand code HTML to learn how markup works. Markup is the engine of all Web sites.

Discuss the Final

Reference this blog post

Assignments

Due Today, April 9

  • Read: “We the Media,” by Dan Gillmor
    • Please read Chapters 7, 8 and 9 through the end of Chapter 9 This is up through page 190 in the printed O’Reilly edition of the Dan Gillmor book. Label this post “We the Media 3”
    • Do a post on this blog (or put a link on this blog to a post on your own blog) related to that reading indicating what the author said and why you agree or disagree with the author.
  • Post a paragraph on the class blog talking about the plan you have for your final project. This should be a general and not a detailed outline of what your project will be about. Label this with the category “Final Project Proposal.”
  • Do the in-class lab on Markup languages. After you have created the page as per the instructions below and have FTP’d it to your space on the server; create a post with the category markuplab and with a link to page you have created

Due Next Week, April 9

  • Lynda Assignment on Dreamweaver
    • Dreamweaver CS3 Essential Training, with: Garrick Chow
      1. Introduction
      2. Getting Started
      3. The Interface
      4. Site Control
      5. Document Basics
      6. Linking
      7. CSS Essentials
    • View all the segments in the listed chapters, including the introduction.

Due In Two Weeks, April16

  • The first episode of your final project
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You should not be getting hung up on technical guidelines, the concentration now should be on planning on telling a good story.

Here are the technicals. Three segments of either audio or video with audio. Each segment must be a stand alone program that tells a story that has a beginning, a middle and an end. The whole point of the class is telling a story using new media, so if your show fails to do that you will lose credit. Each episode must fit into the overall theme of your program. Episodes that do not fit into the theme of the program will result in a lowered grade. Acceptable file formats are listed below. Length of each segment cannot be less than one or more than ten minutes long.

All work must be original. If work by others is included author must be able to prove legal rights to use material. Violations of copyright and/or plagiarism will result in disqualification of segments containing disputed material. Serious violations will result in getting an F grade on the final.

Video: H.264 video, up to 768 kbps, 320 x 240, 30 frames per sec., Baseline Profile up to Level 1.3 with AAC-LC audio up to 160 kbps, 48 Khz, stereo audio in .mov file format.

Audio: 64 bit MP3 Stereo or Mono.

Clinton Video

In Class Today

  • Audacity Lab 1
    This lab introduces audio editing using the free open source audio wave form editor, Audacity. In this lab students will download a sample wav formatted file and, using the Audacity software, edit the audio and export it as an MP3.

  • Assignments

    Due Today, April 2

    Comment on another student’s blog post
    Post a comment on any other student’s post on this blog. Your comment should indicate that you actually read the post.

    Due Next Week, April 9

    • Read: “We the Media,” by Dan Gillmor
      • Please read Chapters 7, 8 and 9 through the end of Chapter 9 This is up through page 190 in the printed O’Reilly edition of the Dan Gillmor book. Label this post “We the Media 3”
      • Do a post on this blog (or put a link on this blog to a post on your own blog) related to that reading indicating what the author said and why you agree or disagree with the author.
    • Post a paragraph on the class blog talking about the plan you have for your final project. This should be a general and not a detailed outline of what your project will be about. Label this with the category “Final Project Proposal.”

    Lab

    • iMovie Lab 2
      This lab introduces the screen capture utility Grab. It also combines the skills learned in previous labs. Primarily iMovie 1 where you created a Quicktime movie. Photoshop 1 where you resized photos, and the use of Fetch, (see the How To section of this page) which you used for your web assignment to FTP files to the class Website. This is the process you will use to create video blog entries for your vlog and for your video podcast. Give your post the category “My Lunch” class time will be allotted for this, but you are not required to do this in class.

    Assignments

    Due Today Wednesday, March 19

    • Read: “We the Media,” by Dan Gillmor
      • Please read Chapters 4, 5 and 6 through the end of Chapter 6. This is up through page 135 in the printed O’Reilly edition of the Dan Gillmor book. Label this post “We the Media 2”
      • Do a post on this blog (or put a link on this blog to a post on your own blog) related to that reading indicating what the author said and why you agree or disagree with the author.

    Due Next Class, April 2

    Comment on another student’s blog post
    Post a comment on any other student’s post on this blog. Your comment should indicate that you actually read the post.

    The thing that I found most striking in the third three chapters of this book was the quote from Buzz Bruggeman that read:

    I immediately scan it, read it and figure out what to do, i.e. respond, comment, thank, forward to our team, etc.

    When I respond to a blogger, he/she is thrilled, and typi­cally writes more about us, and tells his/her readers that we are great people, responding to users and customers and the net leverages all the time. If there are user problems, we solve them quickly; on balance it is brilliant stuff.

    My total involvement in this process once the query is done is almost zero. Probably weekly I check out Google news, Google newsgroups, but the Feedster stuff is vastly more important.

    If you assume that bloggers really are “intelligent human agents”, then this model is sensational as you don’t have to go look for anyone or anything; it comes to you.

    He is referring to Feedster, which serches for mentions of the program he created, “Active Words” and creates an RSS feed to his newsreader, and every half hour he can check what people are saying about his product. I find this amazing that it has become this easy to get customer feedback. Knowing what people think of your product can be so valuable. With the consumers input you can tweek your product to make it better and better. This is the kind of things companies pay big money to find out, and here it is for free.

    I continue to agree with Dan Gilmore on many levels. From making communication pro-active to open source on the web, we can see how learning needs to be two-sided and conversational with the doors wide open. Sitting in a class room and listening to a lecture, for example, is learning however, the real skill comes into play when you have to answer a question or formulate your own question based on the facts given. This is similiar to New Media because the audience becomes engaged and in turn participates in finding the solution and figuring out the facts. There is a dialogue that reveals ideas that were hidden in the minds of individuals. Now, there is an outlet for anyone to expose their thoughts and share their expereinces in an organized and focused channel. The audience can take what is given and make it their own. Open source, for example, is huge in the technology industry. Having access to free code allows creative minds to think out side the box and make history through minor additions to existing data. With out the internet, I’m sure it was really hard to even find what open source was out there unless you were directly connected in the industry. Today, anywhere in the world, you can find open source on the web and possibly patent new technology.

    For me chapter 4 was the most interesting chapter, from chapters four through six in Dan Gillmor’s on-line book, We the Media. Chapter four had a lot to do with public relations which is my major. Gillmor gave many tips on how blogging and RSS feeds are vital for public relations. He also quoted from Tom Murphy on his PR opinion blogs, “Blogging provides a unique means of pro­viding your audience with the human face of your organization. Your customers can read the actual thoughts and opinions of your staff. On the flip side, consumers increasingly want to see the human side of your organization, beyond the corporate speak.” I found a lot of the tips very useful because they pertained to my degree. Chapter five was interesting also and had to do a lot about new emerging technology and how it is affecting politics and the government. I definitely agreed with Gillmor about the renewal of car registrations and how they cannot mail you the sticker but saving money on envelopes and stamps is always a good thing. I also agreed with him on how many government sites need to have a suggestion box where people in the government listen to the average citizens needs. Chapter six had more about journalism and how new technology is taking over traditional journalism. Overall I enjoyed chapter four and five the most and found them very interesting, especially the PR tips.

    Joe Swan

    Who could say enough good things about Joe Swan?
    Former SJSU photojournalism professor Joe Swan, 78, died Sunday. Joe taught in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications from 1963 to 1991. I remember having an 8 a.m. class with Joe when I was a student at SJSU about 28 years ago, in 1980. Joe was full of great stories about his days at Grit Magazine. I doubt I was the only one in the class who had no idea what Grit Magazine was or had never heard of Grit Magazine before that class but we all listened enthusiastically because Joe was a first class story teller.

    Joe was a Texan. He spoke with a Texas accent. Joe was a perfect southern gentleman. Years later; I remember walking around campus with Joe. There was a female university police officer having some issues with two males who were athletic looking and much bigger than her. Sensing that the police officer might be out matched, (despite the fact she had a gun and they did not) Joe turned to me and said, “it looks like we might have to get involved here.” At that time Joe was having some health problems. Neither of us was a formidable force. Neither of us were fighters. Those guys looked a lot bigger and tougher than us! Thankfully the officer was able to handle the situation handily. That’s Joe, he was not a bystander if anybody, especially a lady was, or even appeared to be in distress.

    I have Joe to thank for working at San Jose State University. Before I came to SJSU I was a photo lab tech at the University of California San Francisco. I had my BA in photojournalism. Joe told me about a photo lab tech job that had just opened up at SJSU in the then Department of Journalism and encouraged me to apply. That was 1988. That photo tech job evolved into one supporting computers.

    Joe had an ear to the ground for jobs for his former photo students. When I was there as a student, Jack Fields was a visiting professor. Jack taught most of my main photojournalism classes but Joe was the full time professor. Joe taught some of the other photojournalism classes as well as courses like the morning magazine class. After Jack left Joe taught all of the photojournalism courses.

    Joe watched over and cared for his students like they were his own kids. Many of us owe our careers to Joe. Sometimes he knew of job openings before the people who were doing the hiring would know they had a vacancy. Joe would hear through the grapevine someone was going to leave a job. Our students and graduates would have their applications in the hands of editors before the outgoing photographer had even given notice.

    Besides my current position there are two other jobs I landed that I owe credit to Joe for, including my time as a photographer for the Manteca Bulletin.

    Recently the Spartan Daily ran a story on Joe. It had a photo of him in the hospital and it said, “Within the last year, Swan, 78, has had both legs amputated and has been on dialysis, a process of filtration used when the kidneys stop working, because of complications from diabetes.” The photo I have above, in this blog post, is how I will remember Joe.

    He was one of the nicest people I have ever known. Joe a real role model for aspiring journalism students as well as for new faculty. We lost one of the best!

    The April ACTC Newsletter

    I urge students to find some way to apply their software talents in order to keep them and hone them. I try to practice as well as preach that. I do a monthly newsletter for my bicycle club, the Almaden Cycle Touring Club.

    Here is the April Issue of the Black and Blue Bottom, the club’s Newsletter. I hope you like it (note: the web server the club uses has been having problems, so if the download fails, that is why.)

    Note

    I have been sick since last week and frankly it hurts to talk. So, I anticipate this will be a short class. However, completing this lab is critical to preparing for the next phase of this course.

    Lab: Using iMovie

    • iMovie Lab 1
      This lab shows you how to use iMovie to create a simple Quicktime movie using the iSight cameras in the iMac computers in DBH226.

    Assignments

    Due Today, March 12

    Find a vlog (also called a video blog)
    Find a video blog
    and post the URL of the vlog. Tell the class what the channel is about, if the vlog appears active and how many episodes are on the vlog. Label your post “This is a vlog.”

    What is a video blog?

    • A vlog is a blog with posts that contain video and uses the structure of the blog as its content management system.
    • A vlog is not a movie on YouTube or Blip or a video anywhere else, or a Youtube or Blip channel. Typically the vlog contains both video and related text that puts the video in context.
    • A vlog is episodic and personal.
    • A vlog, like all blogs, is a channel in reverse chronological order.
    • A vlog usually allows comments and usually has an associated RSS feed.
    • Each episode on a vlog has a web accessible URL.
    • A vlog can often be converted into a video podcast.

    Due Next Wednesday, March 19

    • Read: “We the Media,” by Dan Gillmor
      • Please read Chapters 4, 5 and 6 through the end of Chapter 6. This is up through page 135 in the printed O’Reilly edition of the Dan Gillmor book. Label this post “We the Media 2”
      • Do a post on this blog (or put a link on this blog to a post on your own blog) related to that reading indicating what the author said and why you agree or disagree with the author.